The Ahmadis of Algeria: the government’s most convenient security threat?

Despite numbering in the few thousands, the followers of this branch of Islam have been branded a major security threat by the Algerian state. Now, they are facing both a crackdown and a propaganda war. By Jacob Lindelöw Berntson In … Continue reading The Ahmadis of Algeria: the government’s most convenient security threat?

Islamic State just accepted a pledge of allegiance from al-Mourabitoun. Why now?

By Jacob Lindelöw Berntson More than one and a half years ago, a faction of the Sahel-based terror group al-Mourabitoun pledged allegiance to IS. Why did IS only accept their pledge now? The faction in question is a cadre led … Continue reading Islamic State just accepted a pledge of allegiance from al-Mourabitoun. Why now?

Algeria: weathering the storm or about to implode?

By Jacob Lindelöw Berntson In late March, Algeria’s ruling party FLN (Front de Libération Nationale) held a rally in which leader Amar Saadani urged Algerians to stand behind President Abdelaziz Bouteflika and the country’s army. According to the FLN, popular … Continue reading Algeria: weathering the storm or about to implode?

Terrorism in the Sahel: flourishing in the desert chaos

By Jacob Lindelöw Berntson The attacks on the Radisson hotel in Mali’s capital Bamako in November 2015, in which 20 people were killed, once again put the country’s instability into the headlines of international news. With neighbouring Burkina Faso experiencing … Continue reading Terrorism in the Sahel: flourishing in the desert chaos

Tunisia: Top-Down Consolidation, Top-Down Fracture

By Geoff Moore Many have congratulated Tunisia lately, deservedly so. The ‘quartet’ of civil society groups which recently won the Nobel Peace Prize has worked to move Tunisia through its transitional period following the Arab Spring and the removal of … Continue reading Tunisia: Top-Down Consolidation, Top-Down Fracture

Forgiving and forgetting fratricide – reconciliation in Algeria after the ‘Black Decade’

A few weeks ago, Algeria celebrated the ten year anniversary of the referendum on the Charter for Peace and National Reconciliation. The Charter was a plan towards reconciliation, after a decade of horrific civil war, put forward by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika in August 2005 and approved by more than 90 % of the population in a referendum. Despite this, the country remains fragmented. Therefore, one should perhaps not speak about a celebration of the anniversary of the referendum, but rather investigate what this measure has actually achieved. Continue reading Forgiving and forgetting fratricide – reconciliation in Algeria after the ‘Black Decade’